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Welcome

At the Vein Healthcare Center, we’re helping patients, physicians and communities view venous disease and its symptoms in a new way.

Many people who experience vein disorders have been disappointed with traditional methods of care, or have been discouraged from seeking treatment because of limited options.

The Vein Healthcare Center serves communities in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Canada, and brings superior medical care to those at every stage of venous disease. Dr. Cindy Asbjornsen focuses on providing a comfortable setting where she can evaluate your individual symptoms – from the first appearance of varicose veins to advanced-stage venous stasis ulcers – and explore the best avenue for your treatment.

While varicose veins can hinder confidence and the ability to participate fully in life’s activities, venous disease is never simply cosmetic. It is a progressive disease that can lead to incapacitating symptoms, heightened pain, and intensified health concerns. Today, those suffering with venous disorders and their symptoms can improve their overall health, and manage the progression of their disease. Patients can benefit from today’s minimally-invasive therapies with very little pain and outstanding success rates when performed by an experienced, board certified phlebologist.

Venous Disease can be treated.

If you live with the effects of venous disease, it’s the right time to learn about the opportunities you have to ease your symptoms and help you live a fuller, more active, pain-free life.

The Vein Healthcare Center provides services for patients in Maine, New England, and surrounding communities and accepts most major insurances. Visit Dr. Cindy Asbjornsen in her South Portland office, or contact us at 207-221-7799.


@VHC

There are many causes of pelvic pain

What is Pelvic Venous Congestion Syndrome?

Veins have one-way valves that help keep blood flowing toward the heart. If the valves are weak or damaged, blood can flow in the wrong direction in the veins in the legs and feet, often causing them to swell. When this happens near the pelvis, it is called pelvic venous congestion syndrome. Simply put, varicose can also develop internally, in the pelvis, uterus and ovaries.

February 5, 2019 Read more

One patient's perspective: coast-to-coast commute

One of Dr. Cindy Asbjornsen's patients is a 55-year-old nurse with quite a work commute. Beth lives in Ogunquit, Maine, but she works in California.

January 22, 2019 Read more